MedStar Health Consumer Website

A A A Bookmark and Share

 
R2 Year

…R1 Year | R2 Year | R3 Year

Rotation

Length

# FHC Sessions

FHC

4 weeks

11*

FMI

4 weeks

2*

Night Float

4 weeks

1

Adult ED

4 weeks

3*

Night Float

4 weeks

1

Musculoskel I

4 weeks

3*

Surgery

4 weeks

3*

FHC

4 weeks

11*

Musculoskel 2

4 weeks

3*

OB Continuity

4 weeks

1

Peds ED

4 weeks

2

Peds Ward

2 weeks

2

ENT 2 weeks 3*
Community Selective 4 weeks 3*

 

 

* Residents will have a continuity evening clinic during these rotations. Note that we have a night float, so there is only the occasional Saturday call. This makes evening clinic very doable from a duty hours stand point. In addition, by having evening clinics, we allow more time for continuity clinic and preserve more of the time during the day that the residents spend on their rotations.

Purpose

The R2 year is a transition year, one in which the residents become independent with respect to their ability to take on responsibilities as scholars, educators, administrators, supervisors and family doctors. They are required to think, question and learn differently now, and the curriculum is structured to facilitate the evolution of this process.

Family Health Center (FHC)

This year, the pace quickens from one patient an hour to two. The R2 also has more responsibility for our patients and for improving the systems of care in the FHC. As described in the R1 year, residents spend time in the FHC in our Sports Medicine clinic, Skin and Procedure clinics, performing colposcopies and other GYN procedures, and participating in Community Medicine. It is a wonderful month from the perspective of the faculty because they get to spend a great deal of time interacting with the FHC residents. It also gives them the opportunity to carefully evaluate and support each resident's growth and development as a clinician and colleague.

FMI

The upper-level resident supervises the students and interns on our Family Medicine Inpatient team. He/she runs the service and is responsible for the Tuesday morning report experience. The upper-level resident communicates with the attending and continuity resident about the service patients. Our focus includes continuity and the transitions to and from ambulatory care, long-term care and end-of-life care. We see a variety of medical, orthopedic and surgical problems, and are fortunate to have a great deal of subspecialty support. Part of the team is on Friday/Sunday call every other weekend (further ensuring continuity in the care of our patients).

Night Float

The upper-level resident on Night Float serves as the nighttime continuity member of the FMI team. Night float runs from Sunday night through Thursday night. Responsibilities include admissions to the service, covering L&D until the continuity provider arrives for the delivery, supervising Pediatrics when an intern is on call, and managing problems on the floor. It is during Night Float that residents typically truly become confident and independent.

OB Continuity

We assign our new OB patients to residents based on their due dates in order to clump the continuity deliveries for our residents. When the resident is not laboring patients, delivering babies, or running the Friday OB/GYN morning report, he/she uses this time to focus on his/her. Visit Women's Services at MedStar Franklin Square…

MusculoSkeletal (MS-1)

We have two four-week Musculoskeletal blocks (MS1, MS2) in the R2 year. These experience involve spending time in the office and in the OR with our orthopedic attendings, as well as spending time with physical therapists. Our goal is for the residents to acquire knowledge and skills in the fundamentals of office procedures and rehabilitation early in the course of their training, so that they can build on them in the FHC. Visit Orthopedic Services and Rehabilitation Services at MedStar Franklin Square…

Surgery

The R2 Surgery experience consists of two weeks with a solo-practicing general surgeon who has been working with our residents for years, and who always receives high praise for our residents for his teaching, and two weeks in the office of MedStar Franklin Square's surgical oncologists, who also bring a wealth of experience and enthusiasm to our residents. These rotations include time in the office, the OR, and in the hospital rounding on postoperative patients, where their well-rounded training and experience with medically sick inpatients often comes in handy.

Peds Ward and Peds ED

We have two four-week blocks of pediatrics in the R2 year. As noted above, our pediatric coverage consists of a team of two interns and two R2s. One of the R2s is responsible for supervising the ward and nursery interns and for running morning report. The other R2 is in the ED working alongside the pediatric hospitalists/ED attendings. It is a cozy set-up now since the pediatric ward and the Peds ED are connected in one state-of-the-art center. Our pediatric ED is one of the busiest in the state, and serves as a regional referral center for child abuse. Visit Pediatrics at MedStar Franklin Square…

Adult ED

This is an exciting opportunity to learn emergency care in the busiest Emergency Department in the state of Maryland. There is a requisite curriculum offered by the ED attendings. This rotation provides a great opportunity for expanding procedural skills, as well as improving comfort with acute care and seeing a wide range of medical problems.

ENT

The residents spend two weeks with a wonderful group of ENT physicians whose office is in the building right next door to the building where our Family Health Center is located. While the focus of the rotation is on the outpatient arena, residents are welcome to attend cases in the OR as well. Remember, our residents learn ENT (as well as the other subspecialties) in the FHC, on the Family Medicine inpatient service, and in the ED; this ENT rotation time is set aside for the senior residents to refine their understanding of these areas.

Community Selective

Residents will be able to choose between a number of community health-based rotations, including options such as rural training, working with a local Health Department, and preventive medicine practicum experiences, working to implement health changes in the larger community.