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  • February 08, 2019

    WASHINGTON –– A large, national study examining a radiation treatment for prostate cancer––popular because it delivers a high dose of therapy in a very short time frame––supports its routine use. 

    The study, conducted at cancer centers around the United States including at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, looks at long term follow up data for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) used to treat more than 2,100 men with prostate cancer that had a low or intermediate risk of recurring.

    The results were published Feb. 8 in the journal JAMA Network Open.

    At MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, the therapy is delivered by a system called CyberKnife, which delivers high doses of radiation precisely aimed to minimize the involvement of healthy surrounding tissue.

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    Radiation oncologist Sean P. Collins, MD, PhD, says curative treatment is a shared goal along with maintaining a person’s quality of life.  Side effects, including impotence, can occur with all treatments for prostate cancer and can happen years after treatment.

    “While it is necessary to observe these men for decades, our interim seven-year data show that survival and side effects are comparable to other forms of radiotherapy,” says Collins, director of the CyberKnife Prostate Program at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital and an associate professor of radiation medicine at Georgetown University. 

    The National Comprehensive Cancer Network, which establishes cancer treatment guidelines, classified SBRT as an alternative to conventional therapy, but had noted a lack of long term follow up data. There is much more experience with conventionally fractionated radiation therapy, delivered five times a week for up to nine weeks, and brachytherapy, in which radioactive seeds are implanted in the prostate.

    “Our findings give us great confidence that CyberKnife should become a standard option for some men who want to avoid the hassle and inconvenience of standard therapy,” Collins says.

     

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    Collins reports receiving grants from and being a paid consultant for Accuray Inc., the maker of CyberKnife.

     

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  • February 08, 2019

    WASHINGTON –– A large, national study examining a radiation treatment for prostate cancer––popular because it delivers a high dose of therapy in a very short time frame––supports its routine use. 

    The study, conducted at cancer centers around the United States including at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, looks at long term follow up data for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) used to treat more than 2,100 men with prostate cancer that had a low or intermediate risk of recurring.

    The results were published Feb. 8 in the journal JAMA Network Open.

    At MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, the therapy is delivered by a system called CyberKnife, which delivers high doses of radiation precisely aimed to minimize the involvement of healthy surrounding tissue.

    play button

    Radiation oncologist Sean P. Collins, MD, PhD, says curative treatment is a shared goal along with maintaining a person’s quality of life.  Side effects, including impotence, can occur with all treatments for prostate cancer and can happen years after treatment.

    “While it is necessary to observe these men for decades, our interim seven-year data show that survival and side effects are comparable to other forms of radiotherapy,” says Collins, director of the CyberKnife Prostate Program at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital and an associate professor of radiation medicine at Georgetown University. 

    The National Comprehensive Cancer Network, which establishes cancer treatment guidelines, classified SBRT as an alternative to conventional therapy, but had noted a lack of long term follow up data. There is much more experience with conventionally fractionated radiation therapy, delivered five times a week for up to nine weeks, and brachytherapy, in which radioactive seeds are implanted in the prostate.

    “Our findings give us great confidence that CyberKnife should become a standard option for some men who want to avoid the hassle and inconvenience of standard therapy,” Collins says.

     

    ###

    Collins reports receiving grants from and being a paid consultant for Accuray Inc., the maker of CyberKnife.

     

  • September 12, 2018
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    James Spies, MD, MPH, and chair of MedStar Georgetown University Hospital’s Department of Radiology, has been chosen to receive the Society of Interventional Radiology’s 2019 Gold Medal, the Society’s highest honor. The Gold Medal is awarded to individuals who, through outstanding achievement, advance the quality of patient care while also ensuring the future of interventional radiology.

    Dr. Spies joined MedStar Georgetown in 1997 after working in private practice and serving four years in the United States Air Force. His practice and research in Uterine Embolization for fibroids has received acclaim internationally, where he is recognized as an authority on the procedure. Spies has published over 100 scientific studies and delivered more than 400 invited presentations on the topic which he continues to study at Georgetown, along with several other areas of interventional radiology.

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    “The Society of Interventional Radiology has been my professional home for 30 years and I am fortunate to have had the opportunity to help advance the patient care our specialty provides,” Spies said. “I am truly honored to receive this award and, when I reflect on its past recipients, am humbled to be counted among them.”

    Before receiving the Gold Medal, Dr. Spies has sat on many SIR committees, serving as chair of the SIR Foundation from 2006 to 2008 and SIR President from 2014 to 2015. According to SIR, only 60 individuals have ever been honored with a Gold Medal. The award will be presented during the SIR 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting in Austin, Texas, which runs March 23rd through 28th.

  • February 16, 2018

    OLNEY, Md. —MedStar Montgomery Medical Center has been awarded a three-year term of accreditation in ultrasound as the result of an extensive review by the American College of Radiology (ACR). Ultrasound imaging, also known as sonography, uses high-frequency sound waves to produce images of internal body parts to help providers diagnose illness, injury or other medical problems.

    The ACR gold seal of accreditation represents the highest level of image quality and patient safety. It is awarded only to facilities meeting ACR Practice Parameters and Technical Standards, following a peer-review evaluation by board-certified physicians and medical physicists who are experts in the field. Image quality, personnel qualifications, adequacy of facility equipment, quality control procedures and quality assurance programs are assessed. The findings are reported to the ACR Committee on Accreditation, which subsequently provides the practice with a comprehensive report that can be used for continuous practice improvement.

    The ACR, founded in 1924, is a professional medical society dedicated to serving patients and society by empowering radiology professionals to advance the practice, science and professions of radiological care. The College serves more than 37,000 diagnostic/interventional radiologists, radiation oncologists, nuclear medicine physicians, and medical physicists with programs focusing on the practice of medical imaging and radiation oncology and the delivery of comprehensive health care services.