The MedStar Health—Georgetown University Hospital Residency Program in Urology

Our five-year, ACGME-accredited urology residency program continues its longstanding tradition of training and educating residents in all aspects of urology, providing a breadth of clinical experience, mentorship from interested faculty, and exposure to a variety of healthcare systems.

Our goals are to teach quality and compassionate clinical care, provide exposure to clinical research, and to stimulate an interest in the lifelong learning required of all of us. We are able to do this through stable, interested, and well-trained faculty. The relationship between faculty and residents has been and continues to be one of our strengths.

Why train here

Global Health

The Georgetown Urology department supports international health endeavors, and each resident has the opportunity to spend one week working in an international location where urologic services are severely lacking. Residents are encouraged to apply to IVUMed as well as other global health programs relevant to their individual interest.

  • Haiti Léogâne Mission
    Georgetown Urology has a long-standing relationship with the Notre Dame Neglected Tropical Diseases Initiative in Léogâne, Haiti. This weeklong trip is a unique opportunity to treat patients affected by lymphatic filariasis.

Curriculum

Since July 2019, our urology residency has been a 5-year categorical program. During the PGY-1 year, urology interns will spend six months on the urology service. The remaining six months are spent developing important skills on general surgery services such as colorectal surgery, surgical ICU, and trauma.

Over the course of five years, residents will:

  • Learn the clinical management of urologic patients and to perform all level-appropriate urologic procedures.
  • Obtain exposure to urologic subspecialty areas early in residency. The urology resident rotations include exposure to all urologic subspecialties including pediatrics, reconstruction, infertility, stone disease, and oncology.
  • Achieve a better understanding of radiology modalities and interventional radiology procedures.
  • Establish comfort with advanced surgical technique in complex open and robotic surgeries. By the end of the fifth year, the chief is expected to be capable of running a busy urology service and to be confident in the wide spectrum of urological surgery, office practice, and training junior residents in urologic technique.

Rotations

  • PGY-1

    • Rotations (six months)
      • MedStar Georgetown University Hospital
        The first year resident learns basic management of urologic patients across all urologic disciplines. This rotation also offers a unique opportunity for the resident to partake in an intensive endourology experience with regular exposure to a variety of cases. There is also early exposure to robotics, urodynamics, reconstruction, and minor open surgical procedures.
      • MedStar Washington Hospital Center
        This rotation offers the resident exposure to a variety of complex pathologies. The level-1 trauma bay ensures exposure to diverse presentations of blunt and penetrating urologic trauma. This rotation gives the resident an opportunity to establish independence both in the operating room and on the hospital floor.
      • General Surgery Rotations (six months)
        First year residents will spend six months on general surgery services including trauma, plastic surgery, colorectal surgery, and SICU.
  • PGY-2

    • Rotations (four months each)
      • MedStar Georgetown University Hospital
        The second year resident learns basic management of urologic patients across all urologic disciplines. The resident has a unique opportunity to partake in an intensive endourology experience as well as gain exposure to robotics, urodynamics, reconstruction, and open surgical procedures. The resident also participates in clinics to learn outpatient decision making and consulting.
      • MedStar Washington Hospital Center
        As the resident responsible for the consult service, this rotation offers the resident exposure to a variety of complex pathologies. The resident also manages the cystoscopy suite, gaining regular exposure to TURBTs, TURPs, and ureteroscopy. This rotation gives the resident an opportunity to establish independence both in the operating room and on the hospital floor.
      • Veterans Affairs Medical Center
        The PGY-2 works alongside the chief at the VA. The resident runs weekly cystoscopy and prostate biopsy clinics and becomes skilled in performing these procedures. Additionally, they assist in all major cases and manage the consult service.
  • PGY-3

    • Rotations
      • Children’s National Medical Center
        To gain early exposure to pediatrics, residents spend two months rotating at CNMC, one of the most respected children’s hospitals in the country. The CNMC rotation is rooted in academic pursuit. Residents partake in weekly didactics as well as weekly multidisciplinary radiology rounds.
      • Shady Grove Fertility
        Residents rotate at one of the nation’s top infertility centers. Residents learn the workup, diagnosis, and management of male factor infertility. Residents learn how to perform a variety of andrology and microsurgical procedures such as vasectomy, testicular biopsy, varicocelectomy, and vasovasostomy.
      • MedStar Georgetown University Hospital
        The resident spends four months in the operating room participating in complex cases such as robotic prostatectomy, HOLEP, and PCNL. This is complemented by ample time in the outpatient setting to learn how to evaluate, counsel, and treat patients with these disease processes.
      • MedStar Washington Hospital Center
        During this rotation, residents learn the clinical diagnosis and management of pelvic floor disorders. Residents perform procedures such as urethroplasty, prosthetic surgery, abdominal and transvaginal prolapse repairs, and procedures for the surgical management of incontinence. The remaining two months are spent participating in complex cases in urologic oncology, advanced stone disease, and weekly resident clinic.
  • PGY-4

    • Rotations
      • Children's National Medical Center
        Residents spend four months rotating at CNMC, one of the most respected children’s hospitals in the country. CNMC has a distinguished pediatric urology team who sub-specialize in a variety of disciplines including nephrolithiasis, spina bifida, and complex reconstruction.
      • National Institutes of Health
        The four-month NIH rotation gives residents a truly unique opportunity to participate in the care of some of the most rare and complex pathologies in urologic oncology. Utilizing the most innovative and advanced surgical techniques, residents work with the NIH urology team to treat hereditary kidney cancer, prostate cancer, and advanced bladder cancer patients.
      • MedStar Washington Hospital Center
        The urology resident spends four months at MedStar Washington Hospital Center as a PGY4. Two months are spent on a reconstruction rotation, working exclusively with urologists who are fellowship-trained in Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery and Male Genitourinary Reconstruction and Trauma. During this rotation, residents will learn the clinical diagnosis and management of pelvic floor disorders. The resident will also help perform procedures such as urethroplasty, prosthetic surgery, abdominal and transvaginal prolapse repairs, and procedures for the surgical management of incontinence. The remaining two months are spent participating in complex cases in urologic oncology and advanced stone disease and weekly resident clinic.
  • PGY-5 (Chief Resident)

    • Rotations
      • MedStar Georgetown University Hospital
        During this rotation, the chief resident takes ownership of the service, overseeing the management of consults and floor patients. The chief spends the bulk of the rotation in the operating room performing advanced oncologic procedures such as partial nephrectomy and robotic cystectomy with intracorporeal conduit creation as well as complex female and male reconstruction cases. The chief resident also oversees academic conferences such as M&M, resident didactics, and Grand Rounds.
      • MedStar Washington Hospital Center
        During this rotation, chief residents spend their time in the operating room performing advanced urologic surgeries such as robotic cystectomy, pan-urethroplasty, complex partial nephrectomy, and advanced open surgery. The chief resident oversees a weekly resident clinic and manages academic conferences such as tumor board, M&M, and indications conference.
      • Veterans Affairs Medical Center
        The chief resident works alongside a junior resident. During this rotation, the resident develops independence in various facets of urologic practice. At the VA, the chief establishes continuity of care by seeing patients in clinic, performing their work-up, booking them for surgery, completing the surgery, and managing them in the post-operative period.

Research

Our urology department places a large emphasis on providing great research opportunities to residents. Each resident spends four months at the National Institute for Health Urologic Oncology Branch during the PGY-2 year. During that time, residents are exposed to cutting-edge urologic oncology research, in which they can continue to participate throughout their residency. With the move to a five-year program, residents will also have a dedicated research block during the PGY-3 or PGY-4 year moving forward.

The program also hosts quarterly department-wide research meetings and a monthly urologic oncology research meeting. During those conferences, faculty present ongoing research projects and current clinical trials.

Diversity and inclusion

The MedStar Health Department of Urology is dedicated to providing clinical care and promoting training environments that embrace diversity, equity, and inclusion. We partner with community organizations to provide urologic care to patients who are underinsured or without insurance at all, as well as those patients who have historically lacked access to the subspecialty care they need.

We also serve the international community through the MedStar Georgetown Advocacy and International Services Program, which facilitates transportation, lodging, financial arrangements, and interpretation services for our patients seeking care at MedStar Health from outside the country.

We are committed to developing a residency program that reflects the diversity of our communities and the diversity we envision in the future leaders within the field of urology.

Training locations

MedStar Georgetown University Hospital

3800 Reservoir Rd. NW
Washington, DC 20007

MedStar Washington Hospital Center

110 Irving St. NW
Washington, DC 20010

Washington DC VA Medical Center

810 Vermont Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20420

Children’s National Health System

111 Michigan Avenue NW
Washington, DC, 20010

The National Institutes of Health

National Institutes of Health
9000 Rockville Pike
Bethesda, Maryland 20892

Application information

Interested in applying?

Contact us

Please feel free to contact us with any questions about our residency program.

Kim Hall
Urology & Orthopaedic Surgery Program Coordinator
MedStar Georgetown University Hospital
3800 Reservoir Road, NW – 1PHC
Washington, DC 20007

202-444-7371

keh108@gunet.georgetown.edu

Directions

We are located at 3800 Reservoir Road NW, right next to Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., easily accessible by car or by public transportation.

The PDF documents below contain driving directions, maps, parking information, and public transportation information.