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  • January 06, 2022

    Christine R. Wray announces Jan. 2022 retirement after 42 years of service in healthcare

    CLINTON, Md. – Christine R. Wray, FACHE, president of MedStar Southern Maryland Hospital Center and MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital who also serves as a senior vice president for MedStar Health, announced that she will be retiring on January 28, 2022.

    Wray was named president of MedStar Southern Maryland in September 2014, two years after MedStar Health acquired the hospital located in the Clinton area of Prince George’s County. With Wray at the helm, MedStar Southern Maryland saw the development and growth of several new service lines.

    In 2016, the hospital received national recognition from U.S. News & World Report, having ranked among the top 50 of best hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery. In 2017, MedStar Southern Maryland joined the prestigious MedStar Heart and Vascular Institute-Cleveland Clinic Alliance. Wray also helped facilitate the opening of the MedStar Georgetown Cancer Institute at MedStar Southern Maryland Hospital Center in February 2020. This 25,000 square foot facility offers unmatched medical expertise, leading-edge therapies, and access to robust clinical research, all under the same roof. 

    Moreover, the construction of MedStar Southern Maryland’s new Emergency Department (ED) expansion project took place under Wray’s leadership, and remained on schedule despite the COVID-19 pandemic. The $43 million ED expansion project has been deemed the largest construction project in the hospital’s history. The new emergency department opened its doors in April 2021 to provide local residents with seamless access to the most advanced care.

    Wray’s focus on providing quality care has helped MedStar Southern Maryland build a foundation of excellence that will serve local communities for decades to come. MedStar Southern Maryland is grateful for the innumerable and lasting contributions that Wray made throughout her 42-year healthcare career.

    “I have so cherished working with all of you in our commitment and service to our wonderful communities. It has truly been an honor and a privilege,” Wray said in an announcement that was emailed to hospital associates. “Please always be proud of the work you do and how you care for each other as you care for our patients. It is incredibly important work and you are the best of the best!

    Dr. Stephen Michaels, who currently serves as the chief operating and medical officer for MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital, will take over as president of MedStar Southern Maryland Hospital Center.

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  • March 23, 2016
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  • March 23, 2016

    CLABSI Free - A Quality & Safety Milestone 

    This week, Unit 2G, a medical intensive care unit at MedStar Washington Hospital Center, achieved a major milestone: reaching two years without a Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection (CLABSI).

    Central lines (catheters) are tubes that help patients get the medications or fluids they need and allow medical professional to draw blood for testing.  But they also present a particular risk for developing infections, because they are inserted into large veins in the neck, chest or groin.  While these lines are necessary, they must be monitored continuously and carefully.  Medical professionals have been working hard to reduce CLABSI rates in hospitals, and from 2008 to 2013, there was a 46% decrease in CLABSI in hospitals across the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  Yet, an estimated 30,100 CLABSI cases still occur in U.S. hospitals each year.

    How did the physicians and nurses on 2G keep CLABSI at bay for two years (and counting)?  They credit dedicated teamwork for their success. "The most important step is collaboration and communication between all team members,” notes Joshua Wansley, RN, a nurse leader on the unit. “Twice a week, nurse leaders and attending physicians check on every patient and assess if the central lines are still needed for that patient.”

    In fact, nurse leaders take the extra step of reviewing central line records every day to verify that the line is needed. “The goal, of course, is that you only have lines in that are absolutely necessary," says Wansley. "That one extra review could show a line ready to be removed.  If it comes out, the risk is gone.”

    Resource nurses -- the nurses who manage the workflow on a shift -- keep careful records of patients' central lines. Nurses are tested every year on their skills for changing the dressings around the central lines and other protective steps needed to keep patients safe.  “We also talk about it all the time, so we are all very aware of the current situation with central lines. Our goal is to go that extra mile  to protect the patients," Wansley concluded.

    And at the Hospital Center, every patient unit posts its current record in a highly visible place for all to see.  Much like a construction site that records the number of days since its last employee injury, our patient units post the number of days since the last CLABSI.  Keeping it top of mind among every team member -- and among patients and families -- will help 2G and every other unit at the Center prevent these life-threatening infections.   

    For Patients:  What You Can Do to Help Prevent CLABSI

    Patients can also play a role in preventing CLABSI. The CDC suggests:

    Speak up about any concerns so that those providing your care are reminded to follow the best prevention practices.Ask your healthcare provider if the central line is absolutely necessary. If so, ask them to help you understand the need for it and how long it will be in place.Pay attention to the bandage and the area around it. If the bandage comes off or if the bandage or area around it is wet or dirty, tell a healthcare providerright away.Don’t get the central line or the central line insertion site wet.Tell a healthcare provider if the area around the catheter is sore or red or if the patient has a fever or chills.Avoid touching the tubing and do not let any visitors touch the catheter or tubing as well.MOST IMPORTANTLY:  The single most important thing that everyone can do is wash their hands.  Everyone who comes into the room to visit or care for a patient with a central line must wash their hands—before and after they visit.  If you are a patient, speak up if you see someone who doesn't follow this very important rule.  If you are a family member or visitor, be mindful of the rule, follow it, and speak up if others don't. It's simple -- and effective.
  • March 18, 2016
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  • March 17, 2016
    Alexander Dromerick, MD, MedStar NRH VP of the Research Division and Chair and Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Georgetown University, along with being the co-director of the Center for Brain Plasticity and Recovery (a joint program between Georgetown University and MedStar NRH), recently had a very prestigious article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).
  • March 17, 2016
    Curtis Whitehair, MD, FAAPMR, program director for the Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation residency program at MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital/MedStar Georgetown University Hospital is one of just 10 recipients of a 2016 Parker J. Palmer Courage to Teach Award from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME).
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    Patients suffering from neck and back pain now have a new option for treatment at MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital.