Leading the way in protecting cancer patient’s hearts

Our cardio-oncology program is led by cardiologists trained to evaluate and treat people who have heart disease or may develop heart disease before, during, and after their course of treatment for cancer. Some cancer treatments, including radiation therapy and chemotherapy, can worsen or even cause heart problems.

Our cardio-oncology program is among the nation’s leaders. It was the first of its kind in the greater Baltimore/Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. We are dedicated to improving cardiovascular outcomes for cancer survivors.


Our cardio-oncology program aims to:

  • Offer advice and direction for people with existing heart disease or at risk of developing heart disease before cancer therapy begins
  • Monitor people before and during cancer therapy to identify any heart complications and any cardiac toxic side effects from cancer treatments earlier
  • Prevent or reduce further heart damage — and, when possible, reverse it
  • Screen for any heart complications after cancer therapy is completed
  • Provide advice for lifestyle changes to help reduce the risk of heart disease and to maintain health
  • Eliminate heart disease as a barrier to effective cancer treatment

  • Better understand cardiac issues in patients with cancer by participating in research studies

Our specialized cardiologists work side by side with oncologists to discuss patients’ heart function and develop a specialized treatment plan to prevent and minimize heart risks without interfering with cancer treatment.

We use advanced imaging to get a full view of patients’ heart function and give us critical real-time information to evaluate their risk of developing a heart condition while undergoing cancer treatment. These tests include:

Read More About Our Cardio-Oncology Program

Ezequiel Molina, MD, cardiac surgeon, and Ana Barac, MD, PhD, cardio-oncologist, teamed up to provide successful care for cardio-oncology patient Estela Escobar. Escobar was originally diagnosed elsewhere with a life-threatening cardiac sarcoma, but Dr. Barac recognized that the tumor on her heart might be another type of cancer – one that responds better to chemotherapy. Together, the team determined that Escobar had a very rare cardiac lymphoma. She was properly treated and was cancer-free within six months.

Our providers

Cardiologist taking EKG test of senior patient

Expert cardio-oncology care

Getting the care you need starts with seeing one of our cardio-oncologists.

Read our Cardiovascular Performance & Outcomes Booklet

Ask MHVI

Have questions for our heart and vascular specialists? Email us at AskMHVI@medstar.net